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Project Management Software

Project Management Software

  • Here is a TechSoup article called Six Views of Project-Management Software

    It gives a great overview of the various tasks that you'd want the software to perform. What do you think?

     

  • It really depends on what your "project" needs are.

    I'm working as a PM in software development now.  We're in the process of switching from a traditional (waterfall) method where you do all the work up front, project planning, sign-offs, etc to a psuedo-agile approach.  Requirements change, business rules change, etc.  ITMB et al just really doesn't fit where we want to be as a shop.

    So ... the point is, while Project (and the other 'alikes') give you a good planning base, when you're actually in the midst of the project stages, it is somewhat cumbersome.  Quite often PMs have a tough time adjusting to the fact they don't control the whole process and you can't just give an at-a-glace ghant chart.

    We've gone mostly to Sharepoint (with a project plug-in) for the project planning & overall tracking, along with using FogBugz for our issue tracking.  It's somewhat disjointed but it works for what we need to do.

  • We're using Open Atrium (currently in the testing phases). The fact that it's built on Drupal and extremely flexible / extensible gives it a huge edge in my book (of course, we're a Drupal shop, so this may not be the case for others). It does offer a ton of out-of-the-box features that cover basic PM tasks. Stuff I've found helpful:

    • Central space to share / store docs within a group, like a groupware app. This is good for contracts, scope change orders, design mockups, RFPs, etc.
    • Shared calendars for major project dates / deliverables / milestones / events / meetings, which users can subscribe to on their desktop calendaring apps.
    • Priority levels for tasks.
    • Email notification when a task is updated, a la Basecamp.

    There are a couple of interface issues that I've found annoying, but it hasn't affected my use of OA so far. Anyone else using it, especially to manage software development / website development projects? Once it's out of beta, we're even considering using it for client intranet development.

     

    --
    Dave Chakrabarti
    Co-founder | Project Manager
    Nonprofitable.org
    (262) 2DR-UPAL
    (262) 237-8725

  • My organization uses the free and very easy to use online project management system called Pivotal Tracker, http://www.pivotaltracker.com/.

     

  • I have researched and tried numerous PM tools. We have been very happy with Wrike. Here is a case study they did on us: http://www.wrike.com/story/absolute.jsp

    Ryan Wood
    Absolute.org

  •  

    A good project management software should handle the planning, scheduling, tracking and analyzing a project well.www.labortimetracker.com/

     

  • I am looking for a low-tech solution to managing grantors and grant deliverables.  I work for a small health care charity that receives about 20-30 grants per year in addition to general donations. 

    I need a tool to help me track which programs (and components of programs) are being covered by which funders.  We are trying to break our entire program budget into program components and then target grantors to fund those components and track the deliverables expecting by the grantor.  

    For example, a medical visit at our clinic might entail the services of a primary care physician along with a behavioral health consultant and a social worker.  The social worker may work off one grant, whild the behavioral health consultant is working off two or three other grants.  I am less concerned about actual time tracking as I am that we are measuring progress toward outcomes (too, that we do not double-dip with funders).

    I have reviewed project management software, but it does not seem to satisfy this need.  Does anyone have suggestions on how to approach this?

    Thanks,

    Mark

  • This is really an awesome article. This article will be helpful for any businessman, manager or individual to analyze and opt for the project management software that best suits their needs. It is also great that you have posted a list of good project management software. Out of the listed software; I am using Microsoft Office Project Management software from past 7 months which is saving my time, helping me manage multiple projects and more.

  • Speaking of project management software, you can check it out on this blog: http://www.timedoctor.com/blog/2011/02/02/43-project-management-software-alternatives

    They listed the 43 software ordering from the most popular to the least. Most of the software listed has a short review for you guys to have an idea of what the software is about. It also shows a table comparing each software from the other to which software has some feature. Features include email activity reports, integrating with google docs, which applications can be integrated with the software, etc.

    Hope this helps!

  • Check out http//:www.swiftlightsoftware.com. It is a great tool that is less complex than MS Project (although it has links with it so you can simplify an MSP document for high level presentations) and I found it better than Kick Start and At Task for my projects. No Mac compatibility yet, but I think that they are working on it.

     

  • David Allen in his book "Getting Things Done"  takes the approach of it's not in the software but in the mind set and approach of managing a project or projects.  And even suggests that most projects can be managed through his GTD principles with out the need for cumbersome and complex software.  

    The book may be a better investment than software tools.

    Dave

  • Agree with you point, Dave, and I like GTD as well. Just for clarity, Swiftlight doesn't fall into the "cumbersome and complex" category. It is great for planning and overview of a project and helps you focus on what you need to do next. Check it out if you have a few minutes...

  • I can see basecamp in the list. I have used it before and I find it great because of its simplicity and easy to use. Now I'm using another project management software called Latitude which helps me manage clients, documents and other information. Its features are great to handle complex jobs and projects.

  • We are huge fans here of LiquidPlanner.  It's an online system that is super for planning projects, tracking tasks, and tracking time.  It also allows some document sharing and storage but this is definitely not the strong suit.  It is really wonderful for project management, though, and it doesn't matter what platform you're using!  The big strength is that all the time estimates are based on ranges so you get a probabilistic estimate of when your completion dates will be.  Also, it's much easier to update/rearrange than any other PM software I tried; even though it's online, you can do a lot by right-clicking and dragging-dropping!

    Also, they have mobile versions for Apple apps.  I use it on my iPad and it's pretty good.  Definitely harder than the computer, though, but good for quick check-ins.

  • ProjectVision Project Management Software has a free trial and online demo plus lots of white papers and case studies for free download